Anonymous said: Over these past few days my paranoia and dissociation really kicked in and I feel like I'm unable to recognise myself physically or otherwise and I'm not sure if I'm trans or not but I don't feel like the trans person I am now or the non-trans person I was before, I feel as if there is a new person coming or something. I've always had vastly different interests etc depending on which state I'm in. It's okay if you don't want to answer this but I was wondering if this could be DID?

Hey, Adam here.

Although what you’re going through may be stemming from dysphoria, derealization, or dissociation alone, it may be a dissociative disorder or DID.

As a system of mostly cis-gendered males, the dysphoria can sometimes lainch us into an internal debate about identity and whether or not there may be new alters emerging. We have not yet begun our journey with hormones and the like, but that is in our near future. I know, for instance, that Erik (currently in the process of changjng his name/the body’s name to Lyric) struggles with identity and feels fragmented when it comes to defining his gender.

A part of this may be your new self just trying to leave your old self behind so dissociating from that former “self” may be a coping mechanism. However, it may be a good idea to get a journal or blog primarily for observing and discovering other parts if they do exist. Asking simple questions may leave room for others to answer if they’re comfortable. Also roleplaying can be a good method for others to come forth.

As always we are always here if you need to talk or have any questions. If anyone else has anything to add that could be of use, please feel free to add. -A.W

"Surviving is important. Thriving is elegant."

— Maya Angelou (via unculturedmag)

(via tizzyrainbow)

Things To Remember

wittyandcharming:

  • Don’t be angry at yourself when anxiety/depression flares up. It isn’t your fault and no one blames you and if they do they’re pieces of shit.
  • Don’t orbit around your perceived value so much. You’re not the sum total of what you produce.
  • Don’t let yourself wonder why people love you. That’s not how it works. There are not stark, individual reasons that a person can enumerate about why they love you. It’s the entire, unique combination of what and who you are.

(via asy-yooneunhye)

did-system-of-jeff:

hupernikao-collective:

aboutdid:

sugarplumletty:

"Inside" A short film about having Multiple Personality/Dissociative Identity Disorder directed by Trevor Sands

As someone who lives with this on a day to day basis this amazes me with its accuracy and representation of how overwhelming alters can be. It’s only five minutes long and very very well done. Slight trigger warning though, so watch with caution

I saw this a while back and forgot about it, thanks for posting it :)

Trigger warnings: for loud noise (you can turn the sound down) and for mental hospital setting, and for display of switching. If you have triggers around mental hospitals I would suggest proceeding with caution because we do and the first time we saw this it was extremely triggering. 

What I liked:

1) The way they showed the Parts* speaking through the body felt really accurate to me.

2) The format is a very good way to show the chaos of everything inside during a crisis.

3) It was an interesting representation of what I assume is the core Part*.

4) It was vague enough that a lot of people can probably relate to it

5) They included common types of parts such as an introject, parts with co-morbid disorders, a child part, protector/persector parts, etc.

6) It shows what I think is an Internal Self Helper or OEP Part*, which helps with education people about the fact that Parts* are often there to help or at least perform a necessary function.

What concerns me:

I think this video is VERY well done in most ways. Being five minutes long and only portraying one system’s experience, it is inherently limited. Also film is in general limited in its ability to portray DID for technical reasons. I am not sure how I would fix the following things, they are just things to keep in mind.

1) The mental hospital setting is already the one many people think is the only place someone with DID belongs. 

2) It only shows the character in crisis, which. like most media about DID ignores the high functionality of many people with DID.

3) Having the Parts* around the character could be confusing for people who think that Parts* are external hallucinations or that people with DID always hear voices in the same way as someone with an auditory hallucination symptom of schizophrenia might. This could add to confusion about DID and schizophrenia, which are very, very different disorders. 

I am very curious to hear what other multies think as well as what non-multiples think about this video.

I’ve seen this video, but I always hesitate to reblog it because something felt a bit off to me, but I didn’t know exactly how to explain it. Until now, that is; aboutdid pretty much sums it up perfectly. Thank you. :]

I will also add that I like that the body is male, as DID is often seen as a ‘female only’ disorder.

Also, the doctor reminds me of Amber and Natt :p

(via the-blue-butterfly-effect)

khypheneight:

sprite—wings:

when you dissociate in the middle of something

image

This is perfect

(via chaos-under-construction)

"Your feelings are valid simply because you feel them."

— something lovely my therapist said  (via heureun)

(Source: noshameinoursickness, via dumblond101-things)

gwenlightened:

ineedathneed:

watamato:

been feeling kind of paranoid lately

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

Take that time by yourself to get to know yourself and rediscover what makes you shine. Don’t surrender yourself to waiting, and don’t stay isolated for too long, because there’s a beautiful you the world is dying to meet. 

comics that end sadly but wind up being replied to with love are what I live for

(via the-blue-butterfly-effect)

"Please forgive me if I don’t talk much at times. It’s loud enough in my head."

— (via cclbaldwin)

(Source: picsandquotes, via joshuarrr66)

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

(via kbfoto)

sprite—wings:

i’m just thinking a bit right now about how others are always trying to say who does and doesnt have DID and it’s usually based on a few things

  • how many alters there are
  • the gender of the alters
  • the inner world
  • the type of alters (non-human, introjects etc)
  • the trauma(s) they’ve been through

Very well put Kimi. -Erik