gwenlightened:

ineedathneed:

watamato:

been feeling kind of paranoid lately

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Take that time by yourself to get to know yourself and rediscover what makes you shine. Don’t surrender yourself to waiting, and don’t stay isolated for too long, because there’s a beautiful you the world is dying to meet. 

comics that end sadly but wind up being replied to with love are what I live for

(via the-blue-butterfly-effect)

"Please forgive me if I don’t talk much at times. It’s loud enough in my head."

— (via cclbaldwin)

(Source: picsandquotes, via joshuarrr66)

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

(via kbfoto)

sprite—wings:

i’m just thinking a bit right now about how others are always trying to say who does and doesnt have DID and it’s usually based on a few things

  • how many alters there are
  • the gender of the alters
  • the inner world
  • the type of alters (non-human, introjects etc)
  • the trauma(s) they’ve been through

Very well put Kimi. -Erik

hupernikao-collective:

The reason why alters split off in the first place is because they didn’t feel safe. If they don’t feel safe integrating, forcing them would be counterproductive, destructive, and may even cause further trauma. I’m speaking from personal experience.

What many singletons don’t understand is that…

shitabelistssay:

"THE first time it was an ear, nose and throat doctor. I had an emergency visit for an ear infection, which was causing a level of pain I hadn’t experienced since giving birth. He looked at the list of drugs I was taking for my bipolar disorder and closed my chart.“I don’t feel comfortable prescribing anything,” he said. “Not with everything else you’re on.” He said it was probably safe to take Tylenol and politely but firmly indicated it was time for me to go. The next day my eardrum ruptured and I was left with minor but permanent hearing loss."

(via dysfunctionalqueer)

(Source: stopthaterik)

spreadlovespreadkindness:

350 - “Daily reminder:
1. Do it for yourself.
2. Forgive yourself.
3. Everyday is a fresh start.
4. Never stop fighting.
5. You are loved.
6. Learn from your mistakes.
7. You can do this.”

spreadlovespreadkindness:

350 - “Daily reminder:

1. Do it for yourself.

2. Forgive yourself.

3. Everyday is a fresh start.

4. Never stop fighting.

5. You are loved.

6. Learn from your mistakes.

7. You can do this.”

(Source: spreadlovespreadkindness, via jakebabel)

lovequotesrus:

Everything you love is here

lovequotesrus:

Everything you love is here

crayonster:

reversingyourpolarity:

Anxiety is like perpetually hearing the boss/enemy music but never seeing the threat.

This is the best description I’ve ever heard.

(via thestandingupforyou)

Like or reblog if you have DID/MPD

all-the-voices-in-my-head:

sprite—wings:

Want to make sure I’m following as many of you as possible and get us all connected to each other :)

(via swim-for-brighter-times)

(Source: systeminthesky)

Mental Health Community Asks

  • ✚: Do you have an official diagnosis or diagnoses? What are they?
  • ☓: Do you believe in self diagnosis?
  • ☯: Are there any disorders or conditions you think you might have that you aren't diagnosed for?
  • ✞: Do your religion and your mental health have anything to do with one another?
  • ✡: How much do you tell your family about your mental health? How do they feel about it
  • ✤: When were you first diagnosed?
  • ★: Are you currently seeking help from a mental health professional? Do you like them or dislike them?
  • ✱: What's your opinion of the mental health system in your country?
  • ❤: Does your diagnosis/disorder/whathaveyou affect your romantic life at all?
  • ♫: Have you turned to music to help you cope? What's your favorite music for this purpose?
  • ☮: Do you describe your moods or different aspects of your diagnosis with certain terms that other people might not know? Explain.
  • ø: What are some of the best and worst comments you've gotten in relation to your illness?
  • ✎: How does your illness affect your work or school?
  • ✿: How does being neuroatypical affect your day do day life?
  • ☢: What's your opinion on medication?
  • ☁: What are the hardest and easiest parts of your condition for you?
  • ϟ: What misconceptions do you see a lot about your condition?
  • ⓣ: How do you feel about tumblr's view of mental illness?
  • ▼: Do you believe in ableism towards people with mental disabilities?
  • ☠: How serious/significant do you consider your disorder? Why?
  • ♡: How do you feel about people putting their illnesses in their sidebars/freely advertising them?
  • ♋: What's your favorite self care thing to do?

(Source: cult-en, via burn-your-masks)

kiriamaya:

jellyworld:

Please let yourself be proud of small things. Please do that. Please allow yourself to get really excited about playing a video game well or sending an ask you were nervous about or letting a bug outside or peeling the whole orange in one try. Please get so excited about that. Please. That’s so cool I’m so glad you did it.

Always reblog